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News: HOME brings in 2020 with a retrospective of award-winning Mancunian screenwriter, Robert Bolt

I’m currently trying my hand at screenwriting (under the excellent tutorage of Scriptwriting North), love a regular visit to HOME and dip my toe in the world of film both here and over at What the Projectionist Saw

So battling my way through a frankly annoying barrage of emails in my inbox about Black Friday,  there was only one missive which caught my eye and promised me the ultimate gift (and not a BF reference in sight – a GOOD thing).

HOME are seeing in 2020 with their annual British Screenwriters season, 5-22 January, and there’s a mancunian cherry on the cake.

Manchester-born and educated Robert Bolt will be the subject of a celebrated season of works including the infamous and frankly quite epic Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Dr Zhivago (1965).

Happy new year to us!

Curated by Andy Willis, HOME’s Senior Visiting Curator: Film and Professor of Film Studies at the University of Salford, the season will screen three of Bolt’s award-winning collaborations with Lean: Lawrence of Arabia, recipient of seven Oscars in 1963 including Best Film and Best Director, with a Best Screenplay nomination for Bolt; Doctor Zhivago, which won Bolt his first Oscar and Golden Globe; and Ryan’s Daughter (1970), a double Oscar-winning epic romance set against a backdrop of war and political turmoil.

Also screening is the 1966 screen adaptation of Bolt’s internationally successful stage play of the same name, A Man for All Seasons, with Paul Scofield reprising his West End and Broadway role as Sir Thomas More – for which he was awarded an Oscar – alongside a cast including Robert Shaw, Orson Welles, Vanessa Redgrave and John Hurt and directed by Hollywood veteran Fred Zinnemann (High Noon, From Here to Eternity). Rounding off the season is Bolt’s final film, The Mission – the haunting, epic tale of a missionary in 18th-century South America starring Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons and directed by Roland Joffé – winner of the Palme d’Or at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival as well as a final Golden Globe for Best Screenplay for Bolt.

Curator Andy Willis heads up proceedings with a special One Hour Intro about Bolt and his career, commenting…

Bolt is a true Manchester success story – born in Sale and educated in Manchester, he studied at Manchester University before and after serving in World War II. We’re excited to be celebrating this brilliant writer who enjoyed critical and commercial success across such a vast range of theatre and film writing, and possessed a true knack for making history contemporary and tackling moral issues dramatically.

For more details including the full programme list and to buy tickets, head to the HOME website at https://homemcr.org/event/british-screenwriters-robert-bolt/

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Celebrity Culture Events Literature Manchester Popular culture preview The Arts Theatre

Preview: Will Self: A Life in Writing, at The Lowry 24.11.19

Will Self has written his memoir, Will, and we should all rejoice. Almost as much as I rejoiced when he took part in the Geordie Jumpers sketch on Shooting Stars.

Yes I know his incredible back catalogue of daring and original writing and I bring Geordie Jumpers into it (oh just Google it and thank me).

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Brought to The Lowry theatre by Penguin Live, this Sunday, Self will be discussing his book and taking us on a journey into his memoir which, in turn, promises to take us a world which is funny, frenzied and brutally honest, from battling drug addiction in the 1980s to a foray into post-uni adult and, indeed, literary life as the author of both novels and books of non-fiction.

These include Great Apes; The Book of Dave (a personal favourite of mine); The Butt (winner of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction in 2008); Umbrella (shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 2012; and his most recent novel, Phone, which was shortlisted for the Goldsmiths Prize in 2017.

For more information head to https://www.penguin.co.uk/events/2019/will-self-life-writing/

Tickets are on sale and available from https://thelowry.com/whats-on/will-self-a-life-in-writing/

The performance starts at 2pm and when booking tickets, you can pick up a discounted copy of Will for just £8 (RRP £14.99) to collect on the day.

See you there (I’ll be the one not mentioning Geordie Jumpers).

To read about frankly fabulous previous Penguin Live events, please see below..

Review: Jon Sopel – Inside Trump’s White House (Penguin Live)

Review: Paul Mason’s Clear Bright Future – Penguin Live

Penguin Pride – less a review, more a tribute

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Culture Manchester Music preview Preview/review The Arts Theatre

Review: Opera North’s Giulio Cesare at The Lowry

Some years ago, I visited the site where Julius Caesar was said to meet his maker.

The Curia in the Theatre Of Pompey is not only a place of significant historical importance but much to my total and utter glee, a colony for feral cats. Cat lovers this is your Mecca, cat not-lovers probably give this a miss and spend more time in the Coliseum (actually cats live in there too – maybe go to Madrid instead).

Handel’s Giulio Cesare comes with the wonderful tagline…

Cleopatra would die for the throne. But she’d rather kill for it.

And so tells the story of Cleopatra and her brother Tolomeo, as they compete for absolute power over Egypt.

Credit: Alastair Muir

Julius Caesar has chased his enemy Pompey to Egypt where he falls into the murderous hands of Tolomeo.

As Pompey’s widow Cornelia plots with son Sesto to get their revenge, Tolomeo is seemingly more concerned by an ‘enemy’ closer to hand…

Credit: Alastair Muir

Well they do say you can choose your friends but you can’t choose…etc and so forth.

Whilst Cleopatra could be lauded as a symbol of a strong independent women, some may take issue with her tactics to secure her position – that is with feminine wiles and good old ‘female of the species’ straightforward seduction of Caesar.

Credit: Alastair Muir

Nobody’s coming out of this registering strong on the moral compass so, moving on…

Sung in Italian, Tim Albery’s production of Handel’s sweeping and passionate operatic tale is accompanied by a wonderful orchestra conducted by Christian Curnyn.

The set is simple, allowing for the marriage between the voices and the music to flourish and entertain without distraction.

Forgive me for perhaps lowering the cultural tone here but I couldn’t help but equate the spirited, competitive and sometimes downright troubling relationship between brother and sister, Tolomeo and Cleopatra, to that of, what for it, the ice-skating, scheming siblings in the very deep and seminal film…Blades of Glory. Even aesthetically.

DO forgive me – I mean this without any of the slapstick but with all of the heart, passion and downright devilment of both pairs.

It’s a pocket of time that is revisited, referenced and paid tribute to both in the history books and in popular culture repeatedly. But whilst time moves on, human passion, ambition and indeed ruthlessness remains.

And with a wonderfully talented cast and production (a statement which will come as no surprise to those who are familiar with the work of Opera North), Giulio Cesare delivers on this age-old story of tyranny and passion in spades.

Cast:

  • Giulio Cesare – Maria Sanner
  • Cleopatra – Lucie Chartin
  • Cornelia – Amy J Payne (special mention who stepped in for Catherine Hopper)
  • Sesto – Heather Lowe
  • Tolomeo – James Laing
  • Noreno – Paul-Antoine Bruno’s-Djian
  • Curio – Dean Robinson
  • Achilla- Darren Jeffery

Opera North continue at The Lowry this week with performances of La Boheme tonight (15 November) and The Greek Passion tomorrow (16 November) at The Lowry.

Have a thousand questions on Opera-going that you never dared ask? Find out more here at https://www.operanorth.co.uk/your-visit/new-to-opera/.

My reviews of previous Opera North productions can be found below:

Review: Aida at the Bridgewater Hall

Theatre review: The Magic Flute at The Lowry

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Culture Current affairs Manchester Music News People Popular culture The Arts

More than a building…Chorlton Bee Gee landmark needs your help to stay alive!

The Bee Gees belong to Manchester, well Chorlton to be specific.

Yes, ok, they flirted with being born in the Isle of Man,  emigrating to Australia, living in LA, travelling the world, but it was in Chorlton, Manchester,  that the magic first happened.

These fellow honorary mancs formed their first band, the skiffle/rock and roll group, the Rattlesnakes, whilst living in the family homestead on  Keppell Road.

Whilst fans often pay pilgrimage to the terrace house of The Bee Gees‘ childhood, there is another place which carries a significant place in the history of the siblings – The Gaumont – which was previously their local cinema and played host to The Rattlesnakes’ first ever performance!

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Since turned into The Co-op Funeral Care, local volunteer group, Chorlton Community Land Trust (CCLT), are fighting to save the building being sold and turned into flats, with their Stayin’ Alive Campaign.

Member, Chris Peacock, explains

Bee Gees fans from all over the world come to have their pictures taken outside – even though it’s a funeral home!

Turning 100 years young next year, local residents are passionate that this historic building is preserved, given that it is such an important part of Manchester’s music scene, and part of the rich tapestry that is the city’s cultural heritage.

Fellow CCLT member, Simon Hooton, adds

Time is critical to save this landmark building – we have just a few days left to persuade the Co-op to change course. It is an important part of Manchester’s historic music scene, so we want to preserve it and celebrate the world-famous Bee Gees and encourage more visitors to the area.

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If the campaign is successful, CCLT plan to show the historic site some love by using it to:

  • celebrate the Bee Gees’ heritage

  • Offer a new destination for food and leisure

  • Attract more spending for local businesses

  • Put the site on Manchester’s music trail for visitors to the city

CLT have been working with developers and local residents to generate a plan that would help make Chorlton a more vibrant place for residents and visitors and retain this unique piece of music history.

The plans are to convert the old cinema building into a market-style food hall with flexible scope to also be a performance space for live music and cinema nights. CCLT are also working with the local community health centre to bring forward a new GP Practice with potentially a gym, community space and some affordable housing on the site too.

The campaigners are also keen to integrate the development with the upcoming re-development of the precinct and to create a new public square outside the building too.

CCLT has been liaising with both Manchester City Council and the Co-op  and been given until this Saturday 9 November by to raise £250k. So far, £55k has been raised in the first few days.

HOW ON EARTH CAN I HELP?!

I hear you passionately cry!

Start by heading over to the Stayin’ Alive website and watching this video where you can find out more information and make a pledge.

You can also follow the campaign and show your support by signing upto the following socials:

Twitter: @CampaignStayin

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/stayinalivecampaign

Do it for Chorlton, do it for The Bee Gees, heck do it for Manchester!

 

 

 

Categories
cinema Culture Events film Manchester Popular culture Preview/review The Arts

FilmFear at HOME Mcr – the reviews…

7.11.19 – Updated!

Review: The Lighthouse

Review: The Dead Center

Last week I left home for HOME to throw myself royally into their annual FilmFear festival, hosted in conjuction with Film4.

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You can read more in my round up at FilmFear and chills…Film Festival returns to HOME Mcr this Hallowe’en

Here, after surviving three spine-tingling thrills, chills and spills (and that was just in the bar before lights down), I’ll let you know how I got on from my little ‘bit on the side’ film blog, What The Projectionist Saw. Look out for further updates this week.

First up is Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse

Steptoe and Son meets Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf meets The Ring. Oh yes.

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https://whattheprojectionistsaw.wordpress.com/2019/11/03/review-the-lighthouse-2019/

7.11.19 – Second review in – Billy Senese’s The Dead Center…

https://whattheprojectionistsaw.wordpress.com/2019/11/07/review-the-dead-center-2018/